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7. Bohm's theory

Paul Budnik paul@mtnmath.com

Bohm's interpretation is an explicitly nonlocal mechanistic model. Just as Bohr saw the philosophical principle of complementarity as having broader implications than quantum mechanics Bohm saw a deep relationship between locality violation and the wholeness or unity of all that exists. Bohm was perhaps the first to truly understand the nonlocal nature of quantum mechanics. Bell acknowledged the importance of Bohm's work in helping develop Bell's ideas about locality in QM.

References: D. Bohm, A suggested interpretation of quantum theory in terms of "hidden" variables I and II, Physical Review,85, 155-93 (1952). Reprinted in Quantum Theory and Measurement, p. 369, (1987).

D. Bohm & B.J. Hiley, The Undivided Universe: an ontological interpretation of quantum theory (Routledge: London & New York, 1993).

Recently there has been renewed interest in Bohmian mechanics. D. D"urr, S. Goldstein, N Zanghi, Phys. Lett. A 172, 6 (1992) K. Berndl et al., Il Nuovo Cimento Vol. 110 B, N. 5-6 (1995).

Peter Holland's book The Quantum Theory of Motion (Cambridge University Press 1993) contains many pictures of numerical simulations of Bohmian trajectories.

There was a recent two part article in Physics Today based in part on Bohm's approach. The author, Sheldon Goldstein, has published a number of other papers on this and related subjects many of which are available at his web site, http://math.rutgers.edu/~oldstein


S Goldstein, Quantum Theory Without Observers, Physics Today Part 1: March 1998, 42-46, Part 2: April 1998 38-42.
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